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Corot ~ Launched on 27 December 2006, the Corot space mission is searching for telluric exoplanets, meaning planets outside the solar system that are like the Earth, or exoEarths, to you and me. They expect by observing thousands of stars, that “tens” of new Earths will soon be earmarked for the next property boom.
Curiosity Rover: Martian Solar Day #2 ~ I’d be remiss not featuring NASA’s Curiosity rover, currently beaming back some of the best pictures of the surface of Mars since landing there on August 6, 2012. This interactive panorama was stitched together and uploaded by Andrew Bodrov from Estonia, member of the International Virtual Reality Photography Association.
Current Impact Risks ~ Can anyone remember a time when there wasn’t an asteroid about to hit the Earth? It’s a perennially popular subject for the media everywhere, but here you’ll find the true facts and all the latest data. Again a part of NASA’s Near Earth Object program, making a speciality of this sort of thing!
Danjon Scale ~ How the Moon appears during a total lunar eclipse is affected by atmospheric conditions here on Earth. While our shadow blocks out any direct light, some is refracted through the atmosphere to give the Moon a copper hue. The Danjon Scale records the luminosity and appearance of a total lunar eclipse. It was first proposed by André-Louis Danjon in 1921…
Dawn Mission Home Page ~ With the launch of the Dawn mission to the protoplanets (their word!) Ceres and Vesta scheduled for July 7, 2007 this extensive site from NASA answers every question you could possibly have, plus a whole bunch more. Just don’t hold your breath though. Rendezvous with Vesta is scheduled for 2011, with Ceres for 2015…
Dawn - Voyage to the Giant Asteroids ~ And I thought Ceres wasn’t an asteroid anymore… Looks like even NASA has a hard time keeping up with the latest changes in nomenclature. Anyway, let’s hope they have a clearer idea about where they’re going, because the robotic probe Dawn is off to Ceres in July 2007 and will be taking in Vesta along the way.
Digital Images of the Sky ~ A collection of stunning celestial imagery from those who appreciate and wonder about the beauty of space, rather than aiming to crash rockets into bits of it or send animals to perish out there. The time-lapse movies of intriguing nightscapes and celestial phenomena are fascinating, also the section on the constellations too…
Dwarf Planets ~ You’ll remember, back in August 2006, when Xena became Eris, Pluto ceased to be a planet and Ceres ceased to be an asteroid, and all three became the first dwarf planets. That would be that you’d think, except that at the time of writing, there are six known objects beyond Neptune bigger than Ceres, and their classification remains unclear…
Dwarf Planets #2 ~ Now further dwarf planets are being discovered all the time, it’s amusing thinking back to some of the outrageous astrological pronouncements that greeted the discovery of Quaoar, Sedna and Eris for example, when many still thought the chaos of outer space would fit more readily into the existing scheme of things…
EarthSky ~ An attempt to improve the public perception of science, by offering an accessible platform for scientists to speak directly to their audience, on whatever they are getting enthusiastic over. The popular posts feed of the space section proves interesting, providing details of highlights in the sky at night before other sources…
Eclipse Chasers ~ Eclipse chasers are people who travel round the world, viewing each total or annular solar eclipse, as these fire off roughly every eighteen months or so. Don’t make the embarrassing mistake of a certain British astrologer, who advised the latest eclipse would be visible from one remote location, when you couldn’t see it from there at all.
Eclipse Home Page ~ Painstakingly maintained by Fred Espenak of NASA and the Goddard Space Flight Centre, this site “strives to be the ultimate resource for online information about eclipses.” From an astronomical perspective it most certainly is too. Anything you’d ever wish to know is here, plus a whole bunch more you’d never even thought about.
Eclipser ~ Jay Anderson is a retired meteorologist who still teaches at the University of Manitoba based in Winnipeg, Canada. These days he devotes his time to chasing solar eclipses around the world and is a knowleable source of reference for those ahead, with particular regard to the prevailing weather conditions, a critical factor is you’re travelling a long way…
Encyclopedia Astronautica ~ This guy is in love with his subject. Look his name is Wade, there’s a surprise! Don’t be scared off by the front page and the eye to erm, design. Anything you wanted to know about space travel is here, plus a lot more besides, so just start clicking and see where you end up. Think it isn’t rocket science? Oh yes, it is!
Encyclopedia of Astrobiology, Astronomy and Space Flight ~ This site is an online reference of information about astronomy, astrobiology, space flight, physics and other areas of science and mathematics, both conventional and more speculative, such as teleportation and time travel. It is updated daily by astronomer David Darling.
Ephemeris.com ~ An ephemeris lists planetary positions and other astronomical data, at regular intervals and over a given period. This online ephemeris doesn’t seem to have been updated for a while, but still works beautifully across all operating systems, as well as giving details of your sidereal time that can be hard to find out.